The best gaming mouse can make a tangible difference to your gaming experience, so if you\’re trying to git gud in Valorant or Warzone, then a quality rodent will certainly help. There are heaps of options for you to pick from, too—nearly one for every genre—and we\’ve taken as many as we can for a test drive to whittle these vast collections down to just a sacred few.

Best wireless gaming mouse

(Image credit: Future)

Want to ditch the tail on your rodent? These are the best wireless gaming mice for the ultimate in peripheral freedom.

Gaming mice aren\’t just aesthetically different from your average office mouse. Their sensors are designed to be more responsive and more accurate, with little to no smoothing or acceleration throwing off your aim. And they\’re usually designed with nicely positioned buttons better for gaming keybinds than a traditional mouse.

Your hands deserve the best gaming mouse alongside the best gaming keyboard, which means you need to find a mouse that\’s comfortable: the right size, shape and weight for your hand. There are plenty of ambidextrous gaming mice and ones built for lefties, too, if a goofy stance is more your style.

In the last few years most gaming mice have adopted very accurate, high DPI (or more accurately CPI) sensors, so even a budget mouse will likely give you great performance in any game you play. Most of these sensors are capable of extremely high DPI counts at 12,000 DPI or more, when realistically you\’ll play on a much lower sensitivity under 2,000 DPI. Don\’t worry about that number too much—instead, consider the shape and weight of your ideal gaming mouse.

Pro gamers generally recommend lighter, simpler mice, with few buttons to get in your way. Lighter mice won\’t fatigue your wrist and are easy to skate across a mouse pad at high speeds. Below 100 grams is often ideal for competitive mice. But if you prefer a heavy mouse, we have some recommendations for those, too.

We\’ve tested a load of the best gaming mice and listed our favourites below. There are also a couple wireless options, though we have more detailed recommendations in our selection of the best wireless gaming mice. And yes, these days, they perform just as well as the corded ones on this list.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

1. Razer Deathadder Elite

The best gaming mouse for most gamers

DPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 6 | Ergonomic: Right handed | Weight: 105 g (0.23 lbs)

$44.99View at AmazonPrime$48.60View at AmazonPrime$49.99View at AmazonSee all prices (7 found)53 Amazon customer reviews

 Rivals the best gaming mouse sensor available Ideal shape for palm or claw grips and a variety of hand sizes  Driver software requires a sign-in 

The Razer Deathadder has an all-around fantastic shape for all sorts of grips and hand sizes, and I’ve spent hundreds of hours playing games, using Photoshop, and browsing the Internet with it. Despite years of iterations, Razer never messes with the Deathadder\’s shape. There\’s no reason to.

The Deathadder Elite uses a 16,000 DPI optical sensor, but big numbers don\’t necessarily mean quality. Here\’s the important bit: for the Elite Razer chose a sensor based on the PMW-3389 developed by sensor company Pixart in collaboration with Logitech, which is easily one of the best mouse sensors available with 99.4% resolution accuracy and a 450 inches per second, or IPS, rating (how fast you can move the mouse before it loses tracking accuracy). Razer\’s implementation should deliver flawless tracking, even if you move the mouse as fast as you can.

For the majority of games and gamers, the Deathadder Elite is an amazing mouse. It’s simple where it should be, with two perfectly placed, generously sized thumb buttons, has a great optical mouse sensor that will work on both hard and cloth pads, and has the ultimate body shape for a claw or hybrid claw/palm grip.

Image 1 of 4

Logitech G203 Lightsync gaming mouse

(Image credit: Logitech G)

Image 2 of 4

Logitech G203 Lightsync gaming mouse

(Image credit: Logitech G)

Image 3 of 4

Logitech G203 Lightsync gaming mouse

(Image credit: Logitech G)

Image 4 of 4

Logitech G203 Lightsync gaming mouse

(Image credit: Logitech G)

2. Logitech G203 Lightsync

The best budget gaming mouse

DPI: 8,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 5 | Ergonomic: Right-handed | Weight: 85 g (3.0 oz)

Prime$39.99View at Amazon$46.64View at Amazon$46.99View at NeweggSee all prices (4 found)

AffordableGreat shape for those who like smaller miceThree-zone RGB lightingG203 Prodigy is cheaper for now

There\’s more than one affordable gaming mouse worth your money today, but few you can have complete confidence in quite like the Logitech G203 Lightsync. It\’s an all-round performer, delivering stable and consistent performance within a sleek package. The Logitech sensor within is rated up to 8,000 DPI, and it\’s got responsive switches throughout to ensure smooth operation.

You might notice it\’s awfully similar to the G203 Prodigy that occupied this same space before it. It\’s actually identical in almost every way. The only significant difference between the two is the inclusion of three-zone RGB lighting on the Lightsync, as opposed to the single-zone lighting on the Prodigy. It\’s not a huge difference, but one that looks a treat and doesn\’t cost you a penny extra, in theory. if you can snag a bargain deal on the G203 Prodigy, we highly recommend that you move on it while stocks last.

Read the full Logitech G203 Lightsync review.

Best gaming keyboard | Best CPU for gaming | Best graphics cards
Best VR headset | Best wireless gaming mouse | Best wireless gaming keyboard 

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: CORSAIR)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: CORSAIR)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: CORSAIR)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: CORSAIR)

3. Corsair Ironclaw RGB

The best gaming mouse for larger hands

DPI: 18,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 7 | Ergonomic: Right-handed | Weight: 105 g (3.7 oz)

Prime$38.99View at Amazon$55.99View at Newegg$72.99View at DellSee all prices (9 found)

Great, comfortable fit for larger handsHighly responsive with tactile buttonsFeels a bit heavy for a wired mouse, with no adjustable weights

The Ironclaw is the best mouse we\’ve tested for gamers with larger hands. While its design encompasses a strange blend of materials, from smooth matte plastic on the buttons to the diamond print, grippy rubber sides, to the unique, wavy rubber on the scroll wheel, each conforms well to its function on the mouse. Instead of a single cohesive material, Corsair has designated one to suit each panel individually, which adds to the excellent overall fit of the mouse to make it feel really cozy gliding over your mouse pad. It\’s domed and curved fit perfectly in the palm of right-handed gamers, and is one of the best feeling mice to grip I\’ve ever tested.

It does feel a bit weighty, particularly for a wireless mouse that doesn\’t require a discrete battery, and unfortunately doesn\’t offer customizable weights. While that means the Ironclaw feels just a hair more cumbersome than other, lighter wired mice, it also makes the mouse feel more significant and substantial. The RGB lighting is slick and understated, exactly the way I like it, and the unit can be fully customized through Corsair\’s iCue software, including the option to calibrate your mouse to the surface on which you\’re using it. While iCue isn\’t the most intuitive software suite I\’ve ever used, it does offer a comprehensive set of customization options. 

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

4. Razer Naga Trinity

The best MMO gaming mouse

DPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 19, 14, or 9 | Ergonomic: Right handed | Weight: 120 g (0.26 lbs)

Prime$74View at Amazon$92.99View at Newegg$99.99View at Microsoft USSee all prices (8 found)21 Walmart customer reviews

Customizable thumb grip with three different button arraysButtons feel nice and clicky despite being removableDesign is a bit squat for larger hands

The form and function of Razer\’s Naga mouse has come a long way over the years. Its latest version, the Naga Trinity, is the best yet: a small, comfortable mouse with a high quality sensor and three interchangeable thumb grips with button arrays ideal for MOBAs, MMOs, or general use. The MOBA array is the best, offering seven buttons in a circle around your thumb. There are enough buttons to map multiple abilities, but not so many that they become an overwhelming samey blob. The 12 button array, designed for MMOs, has that problem for me, but anyone who wants a whole number pad under their thumb will appreciate the option.

The Naga Trinity\’s side panels snap into place with strong magnets and don\’t wiggle a bit when gaming. Otherwise, the Naga Trinity is the same as the Naga Hex before it, with a comfortable palm grip shape that includes a small pinky rest. The Naga Hex is a bit on the small side for larger hands, with more of a squat shape than some gaming mice. It\’s comfortable in the relaxed grip suited to MMOS, but will still do the job if you play MOBAs, shooters, or any other active games.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

5. Steelseries Sensei 310

The best ambidextrous gaming mouse

DPI: 12,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 8 | Ergonomic: Ambidextrous | Weight: 92.1 g (0.20 lbs)

Prime$43.99View at Amazon$43.99View at Newegg$49.99View at SteelSeriesSee all prices (8 found)322 Amazon customer reviews

Very light at 92 gramsGreat shape with improved grips and materialsMay be too small and light for those with larger hands

The updated version of this Steelseries mainstay, the Sensei 310, subtly reinvented a classic mouse. It needed it. Almost everything is new except the Sensei\’s ambidextrous shape, and that\’s exactly how it should be. Thanks to a new plastic, the Sensei is grippier and can shrug off a sweaty palm. And Steelseries is using its own custom version of one of the best gaming sensors around, ensuring the Sensei 310 won\’t suffer from any tracking issues.

The Sensei 310 fits in your hand just like the old Sensei, and is a great shape for either left- or right-handed gamers looking for a midsized ambidextrous mouse. That means it has a pair of identical thumb buttons on the left and the right, a common issue for ambidextrous mice—it can be far too easy to accidentally click the wrong side\’s buttons as you grip with your pinky. In my hours of testing the Sensei 310, that hasn\’t happened once. The size and shape of the thumb buttons has been tweaked, making it easy to rock your thumb upwards to press them but keeping them out of the way of accidental pinky clicks. Anyone looking for a small, light, or ambidextrous mouse: this should be your first stop.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: RAZER)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: Razer)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: Razer)

6. Razer Viper Ultimate Wireless

The best gaming mouse if you need a sky-high CPI

DPI: 20,000 | Sensor: Focus+ Optical | Interface: USB | Buttons: 8 | Ergonomic: Ambidextrous | Weight: 158 g (5.6 oz)

Prime$129.99View at AmazonPrime$178.95View at AmazonSee all prices (3 found)137 Amazon customer reviews

Best 20K Sensor out thereLong battery lifeGreat feelRight and left clicks feel flimsyFewer programmable buttons than competitors Expensive

The Razer Viper Ultimate Wireless uses Razer\’s new Focus+ optical sensor that jacks up CPI to 20,000, which is higher than any other mouse on this list. 

The Viper is an incredibly accurate mouse with a 650 IPS rating (how fast you can move the mouse before it loses tracking accuracy), which is a very high ceiling for tracking fast movements and again higher than anything else on this list. The battery runs about 70 hours before needing to recharge on its cute little charging dock, making it perfect for long gaming sessions. 

Despite having a good weight and feel overall, the buttons themselves feel a bit flimsy when clicked, which keeps it from being higher on the list; it\’s unfortunate considering the high price and all the other great tech built into the things that rival some of our top picks. That being said, the Viper Ultimate wireless is a great feeling ambidextrous gaming mouse that\’s insanely accurate with a good battery life. 

Read our full Razer Viper Ultimate Wireless review.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

7. Logitech MX Vertical

The best gaming mouse to preserve your wrists

DPI: 4,000 | Sensor: Laser | Interface: Wireless or USB | Buttons: 4 | Ergonomic: Vertical, Right handed | Weight: 135.5 g (0.30 lbs)

$90.99View at NeweggPrime$99.99View at Amazon$99.99View at DellSee all prices (6 found)

Extremely comfortable, fully ergonomicWorks wired through USB-C or wirelesslyGreat battery life when wirelessModest CPI compared to traditional gaming mice

Comfort is one of the most important factors in choosing any mouse, gaming or otherwise, and the Logitech MX Vertical is best-in-class. It\’s ergonomic design allows you to comfortably rest your hand in a neutral position, meaning you\’ll experience virtually no strain, even across marathon sessions. Its top CPI setting (4,000) doesn\’t compete with some of the other gaming mice on this list, but it\’s still extremely precise, with an excellent laser sensor that provides all the precision you\’re ever likely to need. You can also unplug it from your machine and run it wirelessly with virtually no input lag, and it\’s got a killer battery life – just three minutes of charging time will net around an entire day of use. 

If you don\’t need a high CPI setting (and you really don\’t—just turn up any game\’s mouse sensitivity setting), the MX Vertical is an awesome mouse that feels like a luxury. And its unique form factor is eye-catching and pleasantly curved, without relying on RGB gimmick lighting for its aesthetic appeal.

Read our full Logitech MX Vertical review.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: Logitech)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

8. Logitech G502 Lightspeed Wireless

The best wireless mouse for big hands

DPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical | Interface: USB / 2.4GHz wireless | Buttons: 11 | Ergonomic: Right-handed | Weight: 114 g (4.02 oz)

$119.99View at Microsoft US$149.99View at Dell$200.40View at AmazonSee all prices (5 found)

Excellent HERO sensorWireless upgrade to a venerable favoriteCompatible with the PowerPlay charging matExpensive 

The original G502 has long been a classic, a favorite in circles that prize durability, accuracy, and high performance from their pointers. The refresh not only honors that legacy but actually improves upon it, with iterative but substantive changes that elevate a beloved classic to dizzying new heights.

Now packing Logitech\’s reliable 16K Hero sensor, and with a 7 gram reduction in weight over its predecessor, the G502 Lightspeed is also very forward-looking by way of its compatibility with the PowerPlay charging mat. The mat not only charges the mouse on the fly but will actually recognize it and pair it with your PC without requiring the use of a USB dongle. The G502 is also host to a number of other small quality of life features like modular weights that can be added or removed to find the perfect hand feel, and a scroll wheel that can be locked to toggle through steps or unlocked to spin freely. It\’s one of the best wireless mice on the market, and priced accordingly, but if you have the cash to spare, the G502 is worth every penny. 

Read our full Logitech G502 Lightspeed wireless review.

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: LOGITECH)

9. Logitech G Pro Wireless

The best gaming mouse to go wireless

DPI: 16,000 | Sensor: Optical HERO 16K | Battery: 40+ hours rechargeable | Interface: USB | Buttons: 8 | Ergonomic: Ambidextrous | Weight: 81 g (0.18 lbs)

$127.95View at Amazon$149.99View at BHPhoto$169.99View at DellSee all prices (5 found)543 Amazon customer reviews

Swappable componentsExcellent designExtremely lightPricey

The G Pro Wireless is peerless when it comes to cord-free pointers, packing Logitech\’s excellent 16,000 CPI HERO sensor and the kind of latency-free experience you\’d expect from a wired mouse. Sitting just over the 80g weight mark, it\’s incredibly light, but unlike some lighter mice, doesn\’t feel cheap or disposable. Instead, it\’s crafted of high quality materials and exhibits performance to match. Logitech designed every component in the G Pro Wireless to be as light and durable as possible, including shaving down the thickness of the chassis\’ side walls without sacrificing composition or density. Judging from the multiple hard tumbles the G Pro has survived from my desk, it\’s a very sturdy piece of kit. 

It also boasts a length 40 hours of battery life and is customizable, with buttons on the side panels that can be removed and traded out for smooth inserts, if that\’s your preference. You could also pair the G Pro with Logitech\’s Powerplay charging mat and never worry about running out of juice again. The only real downside is the price tag: at a $150 MSRP, the G Pro isn\’t cheap, but it\’s able to fully justify that cost with quality. 

Testing gaming mice

We used enough gaming mice to have a good feel for build quality, button placement, and shape. Our opinions on those aspects of mouse design are naturally subjective, but they’re also well-informed. The tricky part of testing gaming mice is analyzing the other part of the equation: tracking performance, jitter, angle snapping, acceleration, and perfect control speed, and determining how each of those issues affect the experience of using a mouse. 

What do all those terms mean? Here are some basic definitions that will help you understand why each of these terms are important issues.

Grip refers to how you hold the mouse. The most common grips are palm, claw, and fingertip. Here\’s a good example of how each grip works.

CPI stands for counts per inch, or how many times the mouse sensor will read its tracking surface, aka your mousepad, for every inch it’s moved. This is commonly referred to as DPI, but CPI is a more accurate term. The lower the CPI, the further you have to move the mouse to move the cursor on screen.

Jitter refers to an inaccuracy in a mouse sensor reading the surface it’s tracking. Jitter often occurs at higher mouse movement speeds or higher CPIs. Jitter can make your cursor jump erratically, and even slight jitter could wreck a shot in an FPS or make you misclick on a unit in an RTS.

Angle snapping, also called prediction, takes data from a mouse sensor and modifies the output with the goal of creating smoother movements. For example, if you try to draw a horizontal line with your mouse, it won’t be perfect—you’ll make some subtle curves in the line, especially at higher sensitivities. Angle snapping smooths out those curves and gives you a straight line instead. This is generally bad because it means your cursor movements won’t match your hand’s movements 1:1, and angle snapping isn’t going to be useful in most games. Thankfully, almost all gaming mice have angle snapping disabled by default.

Acceleration is probably the most reviled, most scrutinized issue with gaming mouse sensors. When a mouse sensor exhibits acceleration, that means that your cursor will move faster the faster you move the mouse; this is often considered bad, because it means moving the mouse slowly six inches across a mousepad will move the cursor a different distance than moving the mouse rapidly the same distance. This introduces variability that can be hard to predict.

Perfect control speed, or malfunction rate, refers to the speed at which the mouse can be moved while still tracking accurately. Most gaming mice will track extremely accurately when moved at slow speeds, but low CPI players will often move their mice large distances across the mousepads at very high speeds. At high speeds, and especially at high CPIs, not all mouse sensors are able to retain their tracking accuracy. The point at which the sensors stops tracking accurately will differ between CPI levels.

IPS is a measure of inches per second, and the effective maximum tracking speed any given sensor is rated to. The higher the IPS of any given mouse, the better it can keep up with high-speed movement, and therefore maintain accuracy.

Lift-off distance is still a popular metric in mouse enthusiast circles, though it\’s not one that affects most gamers. LOD refers to the height a mouse has to be raised before the sensor stops tracking its surface. Some gamers prefer a mouse with a very low lift-off distance because they play at a very low sensitivity, and often have to lift their mouse off the pad to \”reset\” it in a position where they can continue swiping. With a low LOD, the cursor isn\’t going to be moved erratically when the mouse is lifted up.

We used a piece of software called MouseTester to see if we could spot any glaring issues with the mice we used. In every gaming mouse we tested, though, angle snapping and acceleration were disabled in the mouse drivers by default (though a mouse can still exhibit acceleration that comes from issues with the sensor itself) and never encountered any glaring performance issues.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here